The Resource Vindicating Rover Thomas, Suzanne Sylvia Spunner

Vindicating Rover Thomas, Suzanne Sylvia Spunner

Label
Vindicating Rover Thomas
Title
Vindicating Rover Thomas
Statement of responsibility
Suzanne Sylvia Spunner
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Annotation pending
Cataloging source
AIAS
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Spunner, Suzanne
Dissertation note
Thesis (PhD) -- University of Melbourne, 2012
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Thomas, Rover
  • Macha, Mary
  • Appropriation (Art)
  • Art, Aboriginal Australian
  • Art centers
Label
Vindicating Rover Thomas, Suzanne Sylvia Spunner
Instantiates
Production
Note
"December 2012"
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • text
  • still image
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Orthography -- Glossary : illustrations and maps -- Introduction: Vindicating Rover Thomas: Chippindale's law; The body in the oeuvre; Volume 1: the thesis; Volume II : the appendices -- Chapter one: Holding memory: The Kimberley context; Fact and fiction in Kimberley art history; Rover Thomas's voice, Kimberley Kriol and Gija; Kimberley art history; Art authentication and the Indigenous art market -- Chapter two: Rover Thomas before he was a painter: Born in the desert: family dispersed, with Wally Dowling, leaving Bililuna, working in the Kimberley, Kimberley roads, leaving the pastoral industry, with the Miriwoong, called Julama, becoming Rover, not Walmajarri and not from Kukabunya, with the Gija, Argyle Diamond Mine, At Warmun ; Finding the Krill Krill: dreaming the Krill Krill, knowledge and dreams, on tour with the Aboriginal Cultural Foundation, the dreamer and the artist, Warmun corroborees -- Chapter Three: from dreamer to painter: When did Rover Thomas start painting? : the earliest provenanced works: the Krill Krill boards; Some early works sold at auction; Cultural tourism and the EKIAP; Why is it important to know when he began painting?; The First Group exhibitions; The "experts" have not agreed; Consider the French catalogue; Somewhere between the second and third sets; Did Rover Thomas paint for Ceremony first?: Mary Macha and the Agency of Rover Thomas; How did Rover Thomas go about painting; Materials: ochres and binders; The introduction of canvas; His method of painting; Rover Thomas's health, well-being and understanding: Rover the drinker; Rover the charmer; Injuries and fights; Strokes; Competent to verify his own work; The last days; What painting meant to Rover Thomas?: the meaning of money, how quickly did he paint? -- Chapter four: methods and evidence: Methods: A J Ayer and verifiability; Art authentication and the development of a scientific paradigm: Giovanni Morelli and the evidence from the work, Van Meegeren and the triumph of science, the Rembrandt Research Project, Nelson Goodman and Roland Barthes, Models from archaeology and trafficking in antiquities; The context is the Aboriginal art market; Plato's allegory of the cave: how can the two worlds be distinguished and evidence verified?; Definition of a well-provenanced work and a problematic work: provenance assessment, rules of evidence; History and memory -- Evidence: Waringarri Aboriginal Arts; Warmun Art Centre: A.discussions; recalled and recorded B: recorded interviews C. Informal discussions -- Chapter Five: The primary market - selling Rover Thomas: the role of Mary Macha: two influential collectors, Lord Alistair McAlpine: collector extraordinaire, Robert Holmes a Court: strategist par excellence, the Heytesbury Strategy, the Venice Biennale Gambit, different approaches pay off, Selling to public institutions: Mary Macha's plastic shopping bag; Warringari Aboriginal Arts: the first Waringarri exhibitions, Rover Thomas and Waringarri, the quick and the dead, the relationship between Waringarri and Mary Macha, Waringarri under Kevin Kelly, Overseas exhibitions and printmaking, Well 33 revisited; Warmun to the world: Narangunny Art Traders at Warmun, The Warmun Roadhouse paintings, The unravelling at Warmun, an exclusive agreement, Caveat emptor: a gap in the records, When is an art centre an art centre?, the Balangarri scandal, Warmun the centre of the art world, Ochre Gallery and Red Earth Art -- Chapter Six: the secondary market - auctioning Rover Thomas: Sotheby's in Australia, Aboriginal art made a rare thing in a rising market, for Sotheby's the catalogue is the thing, challenges to Sotheby's dominance, for Lawson-Menzies the auction is the event, and provenance is so last year; Highlights and low points in the auction game
Dimensions
30 cm.
Extent
2 volumes (xxvi, 300; 31, 8, 118 unnumbered pages)
Governing access note
Closed access - Depositor's permission ; Closed copying - Depositor's permission. Not for Inter Library Loan
Immediate source of acquisition
Author
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Other physical details
illustrations (some coloured), facsimiles, maps, portraits
Stock number
MAR13/066
Label
Vindicating Rover Thomas, Suzanne Sylvia Spunner
Production
Note
"December 2012"
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • text
  • still image
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Orthography -- Glossary : illustrations and maps -- Introduction: Vindicating Rover Thomas: Chippindale's law; The body in the oeuvre; Volume 1: the thesis; Volume II : the appendices -- Chapter one: Holding memory: The Kimberley context; Fact and fiction in Kimberley art history; Rover Thomas's voice, Kimberley Kriol and Gija; Kimberley art history; Art authentication and the Indigenous art market -- Chapter two: Rover Thomas before he was a painter: Born in the desert: family dispersed, with Wally Dowling, leaving Bililuna, working in the Kimberley, Kimberley roads, leaving the pastoral industry, with the Miriwoong, called Julama, becoming Rover, not Walmajarri and not from Kukabunya, with the Gija, Argyle Diamond Mine, At Warmun ; Finding the Krill Krill: dreaming the Krill Krill, knowledge and dreams, on tour with the Aboriginal Cultural Foundation, the dreamer and the artist, Warmun corroborees -- Chapter Three: from dreamer to painter: When did Rover Thomas start painting? : the earliest provenanced works: the Krill Krill boards; Some early works sold at auction; Cultural tourism and the EKIAP; Why is it important to know when he began painting?; The First Group exhibitions; The "experts" have not agreed; Consider the French catalogue; Somewhere between the second and third sets; Did Rover Thomas paint for Ceremony first?: Mary Macha and the Agency of Rover Thomas; How did Rover Thomas go about painting; Materials: ochres and binders; The introduction of canvas; His method of painting; Rover Thomas's health, well-being and understanding: Rover the drinker; Rover the charmer; Injuries and fights; Strokes; Competent to verify his own work; The last days; What painting meant to Rover Thomas?: the meaning of money, how quickly did he paint? -- Chapter four: methods and evidence: Methods: A J Ayer and verifiability; Art authentication and the development of a scientific paradigm: Giovanni Morelli and the evidence from the work, Van Meegeren and the triumph of science, the Rembrandt Research Project, Nelson Goodman and Roland Barthes, Models from archaeology and trafficking in antiquities; The context is the Aboriginal art market; Plato's allegory of the cave: how can the two worlds be distinguished and evidence verified?; Definition of a well-provenanced work and a problematic work: provenance assessment, rules of evidence; History and memory -- Evidence: Waringarri Aboriginal Arts; Warmun Art Centre: A.discussions; recalled and recorded B: recorded interviews C. Informal discussions -- Chapter Five: The primary market - selling Rover Thomas: the role of Mary Macha: two influential collectors, Lord Alistair McAlpine: collector extraordinaire, Robert Holmes a Court: strategist par excellence, the Heytesbury Strategy, the Venice Biennale Gambit, different approaches pay off, Selling to public institutions: Mary Macha's plastic shopping bag; Warringari Aboriginal Arts: the first Waringarri exhibitions, Rover Thomas and Waringarri, the quick and the dead, the relationship between Waringarri and Mary Macha, Waringarri under Kevin Kelly, Overseas exhibitions and printmaking, Well 33 revisited; Warmun to the world: Narangunny Art Traders at Warmun, The Warmun Roadhouse paintings, The unravelling at Warmun, an exclusive agreement, Caveat emptor: a gap in the records, When is an art centre an art centre?, the Balangarri scandal, Warmun the centre of the art world, Ochre Gallery and Red Earth Art -- Chapter Six: the secondary market - auctioning Rover Thomas: Sotheby's in Australia, Aboriginal art made a rare thing in a rising market, for Sotheby's the catalogue is the thing, challenges to Sotheby's dominance, for Lawson-Menzies the auction is the event, and provenance is so last year; Highlights and low points in the auction game
Dimensions
30 cm.
Extent
2 volumes (xxvi, 300; 31, 8, 118 unnumbered pages)
Governing access note
Closed access - Depositor's permission ; Closed copying - Depositor's permission. Not for Inter Library Loan
Immediate source of acquisition
Author
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Other physical details
illustrations (some coloured), facsimiles, maps, portraits
Stock number
MAR13/066

Library Locations

    • Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS)Borrow it
      51 Lawson Cres, Acton, ACT, 2601, AU
      -35.292556 149.118617
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