The Resource How far can we go? The role of the language interpreter in Aboriginal Australia

How far can we go? The role of the language interpreter in Aboriginal Australia

Label
How far can we go? The role of the language interpreter in Aboriginal Australia
Title
How far can we go? The role of the language interpreter in Aboriginal Australia
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
[Abstract from AIATSIS Research - Barry McDonald and Malcolm Heffernan] The official picture of the language interpreter as set out in the industry's national code of ethics and practice describes an operative who acts as a radically objective mouthpiece for the two sides in intercultural communications involving speakers of different languages. While certainly desirable, this picture represents an ideal, framed and discussed in the code in a largely theoretical way, devoid of social, cultural and political context. Our research (funded by an AIATSIS Research Grant) examines this ideal in relation to the work of Australian Aboriginal interpreters who, almost by definition, come from remote communities where access to Western education, and experience of the Western mainstream's highly-urbanised and literacy-based structures are comparatively reduced. We interviewed ten senior Aboriginal interpreters from Central Australia, on whether they believe it is unrealistic and even unreasonable to expect Aboriginal interpreters to shoulder the sole responsibility for the carriage of intercultural communications involving language difference. Our interviewees recognised two significant barriers to effective intercultural communication. These have been theorised as the Difference Model (Walsh 1997, the two cultures are separated by a huge conceptual gulf), and the Dominance Model (Eades 2004, the mainstream is sometimes less interested in equal and clear communication than in exerting power over Aboriginal people in communication). Interpreters' responses to these barriers varied widely
Member of
Date time place
Filmed in Canberra, A.C.T., 2011
Information about documentation
Abstract
PerformerNote
Barry McDonald; Malcolm Heffernan
Series statement
AIATSIS_109 ; V09319_1-13
Label
How far can we go? The role of the language interpreter in Aboriginal Australia
Link
http://aiatsis.gov.au/collections/using-collection/ordering-collection-items
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Not auditioned
  • The views and opinions expressed by speakers during the AIATSIS Seminar Series do not necessarily reflect those of AIATSIS, and the Institute accepts no responsibility for them
Governing access note
Conditions apply
Immediate source of acquisition
Kate Smith;
Note
Release form
Stock number
AIATSIS_001
Label
How far can we go? The role of the language interpreter in Aboriginal Australia
Link
http://aiatsis.gov.au/collections/using-collection/ordering-collection-items
Publication
Note
  • Not auditioned
  • The views and opinions expressed by speakers during the AIATSIS Seminar Series do not necessarily reflect those of AIATSIS, and the Institute accepts no responsibility for them
Governing access note
Conditions apply
Immediate source of acquisition
Kate Smith;
Note
Release form
Stock number
AIATSIS_001

Library Locations

    • Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS)Borrow it
      51 Lawson Cres, Acton, ACT, 2601, AU
      -35.292556 149.118617
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