The Resource Aboriginal imprisonment in Australia (a background paper on present research), by Cheryl Fairclough; based on a literature search conducted by Adam Clark

Aboriginal imprisonment in Australia (a background paper on present research), by Cheryl Fairclough; based on a literature search conducted by Adam Clark

Label
Aboriginal imprisonment in Australia (a background paper on present research)
Title
Aboriginal imprisonment in Australia (a background paper on present research)
Statement of responsibility
by Cheryl Fairclough; based on a literature search conducted by Adam Clark
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Fairclough, Cheryl
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Prisoners, Aboriginal Australian
  • Aboriginal Australians
Label
Aboriginal imprisonment in Australia (a background paper on present research), by Cheryl Fairclough; based on a literature search conducted by Adam Clark
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • "August 1984"
  • "Produced as an internal document for World Vision International / South Pacific at the request of Australian Aborigines, WV South Pacific
  • "Background information : in-house distribution only"
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Contents
Rates of Aboriginal imprisonment : why examine imprisonment?; Sources of statistics; Caution re interpretation of statistics on Aboriginal imprisonment; Imprisonment rates - Aborigines vs non-Aborigines; Imprisonment rates - Aborigines vs other minorities; Case studies - characteristics of offenders; Types of crime which resulted in imprisonment; Recidivism; Offenders among kin; Summary of general trends -- Possible reasons for higher imprisonment rates -- Aboriginal criminality : Are Aborigines more criminal by nature?; Are Aboriginal offenders more visible?; Is there a higher rate of unsuccessful crime among Aborigines?; Conclusion -- Aboriginal law and white law - a case of differing concepts: is there an Aboriginal legal system?; The social roots of Aboriginal law; The priorities of Aboriginal law; Aboriginal law and white law - a fundamental difference of culture; Aboriginal acceptance of white law; One law for all? -- Crime and the breakdown of Aboriginal society: the undermining of Aboriginal law as a force for social order; economic factors undermining traditional society; The result - social disintegration; The sub-culture of poverty; The functions of alcohol in Aboriginal society; Growing up in the sub-culture of poverty -- Discrimination & misunderstanding in the white legal system : authority figures and the detection of deviance; The police; Lawyers; The courts; Conclusion -- Why Aborigines are in prison -- Prison - is it pointless?: Prison as a punishment - a little clout; Prison as a deterrent - a dismal failure; Prison as a rehabilitator - counterproductive; Isolating the dangerous or hiding the disturbance? -- Prison - the last resort of a failed system: Behaviour bonds in an unchanged society; Fines and the Aboriginal economy; Prison - the last resort -- Points of positive intervention : the cycle of Aboriginal crime and imprisonment; Options for intervention; Community development programs; An economic base - land rights, power and money; Educating blacks ad whites; Alcohol and Christian discipleship; Group social action; Development of an Aboriginal criminology; Decriminalization of drunkenness; Educating and limiting the police; A culturally-appropriate legal service; More Aborignal participation in the white legal system; Aboriginal courts; White law recognizing black law; Aboriginal institutions; Appropriate prison training programs; Conclusion
Dimensions
33 cm
Extent
62, [7] leaves
Governing access note
Open access - reading. Closed copying & limited use. Not for Inter-Library Loan
Immediate source of acquisition
ATSIC Library
Label
Aboriginal imprisonment in Australia (a background paper on present research), by Cheryl Fairclough; based on a literature search conducted by Adam Clark
Publication
Note
  • "August 1984"
  • "Produced as an internal document for World Vision International / South Pacific at the request of Australian Aborigines, WV South Pacific
  • "Background information : in-house distribution only"
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Contents
Rates of Aboriginal imprisonment : why examine imprisonment?; Sources of statistics; Caution re interpretation of statistics on Aboriginal imprisonment; Imprisonment rates - Aborigines vs non-Aborigines; Imprisonment rates - Aborigines vs other minorities; Case studies - characteristics of offenders; Types of crime which resulted in imprisonment; Recidivism; Offenders among kin; Summary of general trends -- Possible reasons for higher imprisonment rates -- Aboriginal criminality : Are Aborigines more criminal by nature?; Are Aboriginal offenders more visible?; Is there a higher rate of unsuccessful crime among Aborigines?; Conclusion -- Aboriginal law and white law - a case of differing concepts: is there an Aboriginal legal system?; The social roots of Aboriginal law; The priorities of Aboriginal law; Aboriginal law and white law - a fundamental difference of culture; Aboriginal acceptance of white law; One law for all? -- Crime and the breakdown of Aboriginal society: the undermining of Aboriginal law as a force for social order; economic factors undermining traditional society; The result - social disintegration; The sub-culture of poverty; The functions of alcohol in Aboriginal society; Growing up in the sub-culture of poverty -- Discrimination & misunderstanding in the white legal system : authority figures and the detection of deviance; The police; Lawyers; The courts; Conclusion -- Why Aborigines are in prison -- Prison - is it pointless?: Prison as a punishment - a little clout; Prison as a deterrent - a dismal failure; Prison as a rehabilitator - counterproductive; Isolating the dangerous or hiding the disturbance? -- Prison - the last resort of a failed system: Behaviour bonds in an unchanged society; Fines and the Aboriginal economy; Prison - the last resort -- Points of positive intervention : the cycle of Aboriginal crime and imprisonment; Options for intervention; Community development programs; An economic base - land rights, power and money; Educating blacks ad whites; Alcohol and Christian discipleship; Group social action; Development of an Aboriginal criminology; Decriminalization of drunkenness; Educating and limiting the police; A culturally-appropriate legal service; More Aborignal participation in the white legal system; Aboriginal courts; White law recognizing black law; Aboriginal institutions; Appropriate prison training programs; Conclusion
Dimensions
33 cm
Extent
62, [7] leaves
Governing access note
Open access - reading. Closed copying & limited use. Not for Inter-Library Loan
Immediate source of acquisition
ATSIC Library

Library Locations

    • Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS)Borrow it
      51 Lawson Cres, Acton, ACT, 2601, AU
      -35.292556 149.118617
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